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Montana, east, Yellowstone River with the confluence of the Judith River at sunset. I think it's safe to say that William Clark of Lewis and Clark liked this area of the Yellowstone where it intersects with the Judith River. He named the adjoining river Judith after his girlfriend Julia Hancock. At least that's the way history records the events of May 29th 1805. Lewis described it as a handsome river and not surprisingly there was evidence of native American camps in the area. In 1865 the U.S. Army built a fort they called Camp Cook on the west bank of the Judith and abandoned it in 1869. It was one of the most remote and difficult to access military posts in Montana and it's said that it was so remote that "even the indians moved away and left it alone". Obviously an exaggeration meant to emphasize distance and the sense of being in the rugged far west. Sales of this image benefit a non-profit organization. Global Health Equity Foundation is a philanthropic organization making tangible improvements toward global health equity. The Foundation combines research with advocacy and capacity-building projects.
Copyright
©Leland Howard Fine Art Nature Photography and Meta Space Communications
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9926x5857 / 29.8MB
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Rivers — Creeks, Montana East
Montana, east, Yellowstone River with the confluence of the Judith River at sunset. I think it's safe to say that William Clark of Lewis and Clark liked this area of the Yellowstone where it intersects with the Judith River. He named the adjoining river Judith after his girlfriend Julia Hancock. At least that's the way history records the events of May 29th 1805. Lewis described it as a handsome river and not surprisingly there was evidence of native American camps in the area. In 1865 the U.S. Army built a fort they called Camp Cook on the west bank of the Judith and abandoned it in 1869. It was one of the most remote and difficult to access military posts in Montana and it's said that it was so remote that "even the indians moved away and left it alone". Obviously an exaggeration meant to emphasize distance and the sense of being in the rugged far west. Sales of this image benefit a non-profit organization. Global Health Equity Foundation is a philanthropic organization making tangible improvements toward global health equity. The Foundation combines research with advocacy and capacity-building projects.