Image 1 of 1

dt2112bodie.jpg

Add to Cart Add to Lightbox Download
California, northern. "Goodbye God, I'm going to Bodie". The brochure says this is what a little girl wrote in her diary when she found out her family was taking her to this infamous town described as second to none for badmen, wickedness and the worst climate outdoors. In typical poetic reverend fashion, F.M. Warrington described this gold rush town in the high desert of northern California as "a sea of sin, lashed by the tempests of lust and passion". Besides the popular pastimes like murder, hanging or drinking whiskey in one or more of the 65 bars, there was of course other opportunities for entertainment. A row of one-room cabins called "cribs" housed the likes of The Beautiful Doll (alias Madame Mustache), Rosa May, Emma Goldsmith, Nellie Monroe, French Joe and as they say, other popular ladies. I found an account of how one popular lady married a local butcher and later became "respectable". Tourists walk the streets now in the town described by the forest service as being in a state of arrested decay - interesting terminology. A few of the buildings are open like the museum and church but most are sealed with locked doors and wire over the windows. A look through the windows and it becomes quite obvious that you wouldn't want to venture inside anyway. Although a bio suit might allow investigations of the incredible array of antiques covered with dust and in disarray.
Copyright
©Leland Howard of Howard Fine Art Nature Photography
Image Size
7216x5412 / 27.4MB
Contained in galleries
Silent Places, Bodie
California, northern. "Goodbye God, I'm going to Bodie". The brochure says this is what a little girl wrote in her diary when she found out her family was taking her to this infamous town described as second to none for badmen, wickedness and the worst climate outdoors. In typical poetic reverend fashion, F.M. Warrington described this gold rush town in the high desert of northern California as "a sea of sin, lashed by the tempests of lust and passion". Besides the popular pastimes like murder, hanging or drinking whiskey in one or more of the 65 bars, there was of course other opportunities for entertainment. A row of one-room cabins called "cribs" housed the likes of The Beautiful Doll (alias Madame Mustache), Rosa May, Emma Goldsmith, Nellie Monroe, French Joe and as they say, other popular ladies. I found an account of how one popular lady married a local butcher and later became "respectable". Tourists walk the streets now in the town described by the forest service as being in a state of arrested decay - interesting terminology. A few of the buildings are open like the museum and church but most are sealed with locked doors and wire over the windows. A look through the windows and it becomes quite obvious that you wouldn't want to venture inside anyway.  Although a bio suit might allow investigations of the incredible array of antiques covered with dust and in disarray.