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Montana, east, Cabin in Chief Plenty Coups State Park that was the Chief's home. Chief Plenty Coups historical legacy is impressive. His name in Crow "aleek-chea-ahoosh" means "many achievements". As the last traditional Chief of the Crow Nation, it's said that he was a visionary that lead his people from the "Buffalo Days" into the 20th century. A visionary, a statesman and ambassador but he must of also been a man of wisdom and insight. My sense is he recognized that a way of life for the Crow people was changing forever and the shedding of blood would be in vain. He was instrumental in creating a bond between the U.S. and the Crow nation that went as far as volunteering to fight enemies of the U.S. I also see a man with some sadness at the loss of a traditional way of life, which his writings certainly convey.

The cabin that was his home in east Montana is open to the public and one is free to walk the squeaky wood floors, read the historical documentation and imagine the life of a Crow Chief and leader during this time of turbulent change. The bright colored scarfs and beads hung on the bush to the left are offerings by Crow people placed there during respectful ceremonial observances.
Copyright
©Leland Howard of Howard Fine Art Nature Photography
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7216x5414 / 26.2MB
Contained in galleries
Montana East, Old Barns and Historical Structures
Montana, east, Cabin in Chief Plenty Coups State Park that was the Chief's home. Chief Plenty Coups historical legacy is impressive. His name in Crow "aleek-chea-ahoosh" means "many achievements". As the last traditional Chief of the Crow Nation, it's said that he was a visionary that lead his people from the "Buffalo Days" into the 20th century. A visionary, a statesman and ambassador but he must of also been a man of wisdom and insight. My sense is he recognized that a way of life for the Crow people was changing forever and the shedding of blood would be in vain. He was instrumental in creating a bond between the U.S. and the Crow nation that went as far as volunteering to fight enemies of the U.S. I also see a man with some sadness at the loss of a traditional way of life, which his writings certainly convey.<br />
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The cabin that was his home in east Montana is open to the public and one is free to walk the squeaky wood floors, read the historical documentation and imagine the life of a Crow Chief and leader during this time of turbulent change. The bright colored scarfs and beads hung on the bush to the left are offerings by Crow people placed there during respectful ceremonial observances.